New Pfizer drug brings hope to CML patients

Over the past several years, LLS has been working hard to get new therapies to patients with some of the rarer forms of blood cancer. So it’s nice to see the FDA approve a new drug that aligns so well with our organization’s vision.

Pfizer’s Bosulif (bosutinib), was approved earlier this week to treat chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), a disease that affects about 5,430 individuals annually in the United States according to the FDA. Like Gleevec, a common first-line of defence for many CML patients,  this new cancer killer works on the molecular level.

Most people with CML have a specific type of genetic mutation called the Philadelphia chromosome. This mutation causes bone marrow to make an enzyme that triggers the abnormal growth of white blood cells. Bosulif blocks the enzyme’s signal that causes the white blood cells to grow.

Bosulif is designed specifically for patients who have CML with the Philadelphia mutation and cannot tolerate Gleevec or have stopped responding to other treatments.

For the 26,000 Americans presently living with the disease, it’s hope redefined.

September is Blood Cancer Awareness Month! Follow us on Facebook to learn more about how LLS is helping create a world without blood cancer.

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About Megan Kilkenny

LLS Sr. Director, Marketing Communication Team In Training Alum Three-time Nike Women's Half Marathon finisher
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One Response to New Pfizer drug brings hope to CML patients

  1. Pingback: Another CML win! | LLS: Truly Relentless

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